How E-learning has Changed Drastically in the Last Decade

The following is a guest post by Heman Thuranira, a content creator. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us

Did you know that you don’t have to be a student at Caltech or MIT to benefit from what their professors are teaching? All you need is a computer or phone and a stable internet connection, and voila, you are interacting with faculty from any prestigious institution in the world on social media. Let’s take a look at how much e-learning has changed in the last decade!

1.  Evolution of social media e-learning.

A hashtag is enough to connect an entire learning community on Twitter. Through that connection, you can share lesson notes, assignments, views, and the whole course module. A closed group on Facebook or a private account on Instagram can help you achieve all your teaching and learning objectives.

These platforms also have features that enable you to communicate “live” and in real-time. So you could be lying on a beach in Ireland while giving a lecture to your learners in San Diego via Facebook.

2.  Cloud-based e-learning

With the current trends in cloud-based e-learning, you no longer have to spend sleepless nights wondering and worrying about your homework. With the rise in the e-learning trend, you can search for an online tutor to get assignment help and assistance with your homework.

The cloud e-learning system has evolved so much over the last decade that institutions no longer have to invest in expensive servers and software. For instance; admission, evaluation, surveys, customer care, and communication information can be stored on the cloud. That saves money, time, and space. With that said, the benefits of cloud-based e-learning are limitless.

3.  Artificial Intelligence.

A few years back, if you wanted to learn or teach in China, you would have to learn Chinese or hire a translator. Artificial intelligence (AI) has changed all that. You can write a statement in English on Google and have it instantly translated into more than 50 languages. Breaking down the language barriers between different cultures has further enabled online education to reach across the world!

Some institutions are already using bots for research, customer care, and grading exams. AI presents exciting future opportunities for educational institutions.

4.  Virtual reality and augmented reality

Experts argue that from 2006, e-learning moved to a new level through the introduction of virtual and augmented reality. Learners don’t have to imagine how a butterfly transforms from larva to butterfly anymore. With virtual reality, they can now see it!

With virtual and augmented reality, you can simulate any topic to enhance the learning experience. You no longer have to look for ways of explaining how covalent bonds are formed in chemistry. Augmented reality enables you to visually explain complex topics to your students.

Conclusion

It’s safe to conclude that e-learning is the future of education. It’s no secret that the present generation opts to spend most of their time online, and a natural extension of the internet’s capabilities is transforming that power for educational purposes. At some point, schools might have to find other ways of using their lecture halls as students will be learning through the web. What will they do with all those rooms?

Author’s Bio: Heman Thuranira is a competent SEO content writer who specializes in offering blog writing, ghostwriting, and copywriting services. He takes pride in providing SEO optimized, engaging, and high-quality digital marketing content to both B2B and B2C businesses. His content will increase your business, blog, or website social media attention and search engine ranking. For any SEO content writing service assistance; he is your go-to Guru.

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.

How AI can help Students in Online Education

The following is a guest post by Pete McCain, a technology startup enthusiast associated with App Velocity. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us

There was a time when we all were highly skeptical about online education because we couldn’t fathom a computer screen replacing our classrooms and the education ideals that come with them. But now examining the impact of online education, we can clearly see how eagerly we’ve embraced the idea of e-learning. It has levelled up education in the developed parts of the world and democratized education where schools and teachers couldn’t reach.

We’ve come a long way as far as online education is concerned. However, there’s a still long road ahead with many developments to come. One of the major developments on the horizon is Artificial Intelligence (AI).

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is one of the most passionately debated subjects in the world of technology. For some, it’s the biggest and the most dangerous threat to our world. While for others, artificial intelligence is the beacon of hope that will bring positive fundamental changes to our daily lives. Hold your horses whichever side you’re on as we’re not going to delve into this debate (and you can understand why).

It’s predicted that almost no industry in the world will be left untouched by AI, and Education is no exception. The latest report by TechNavio forecasts the Artificial Intelligence Market in the US Education Sector to grow at a CAGR of 47.77% during the period 2018-2022.

This continuous rise of Artificial Intelligence in education is going to bring a bundle of good news for students and in particular, for the students taking their education online. Let’s explore 5 different ways AI is going to improve e-learning.

1. Custom-tailored Learning for Each Student

Artificial Intelligence is primarily driven by data. It collects information about the student from various sources to gain an extensive understanding. This data could include preferences, interests, strengths & weaknesses, past courses, etc. AI, depending upon the student, could put more emphasis on subjects that a student might be struggling at.

2. Feedback to Educators

No matter how good of an educator you are or how good the educational material is, there’s always room for improvement. However, it can be difficult to gain insight into what areas need improvement. Here comes AI. Through its algorithms, it will fetch data about topics that students have not understood properly and will give this feedback to the course designers and/or educators.

For example, if most of the students give a wrong answer to a certain question, then there’s a good possibility that they haven’t understood the topic clearly. AI will dig deep into the possible reasons behind it and will provide valuable feedback that will improve the quality of education.

3. AI Tutors: The Next Big Thing in Online Education?

One of the major arguments that go against e-learning is the lack of personal touch. No matter how much you love e-learning, this argument will always go against you. And you can’t deny that there’s a degree of truth to this as well.

This argument won’t hold water for much longer as AI is set to bridge this gap with AI tutors. Students will be able to turn to a robot (a computer program) to help them understand difficult parts of the course. This is surely great news for students as it’s no secret that AI tutor helps them learn better and faster.

This sort of technology is already in its pilot mode and your tutor could be on its way sooner than expected. Excited?

4. Smart Content

AI can produce the content of your textbook. Now, read the sentence again. Read it once again if you couldn’t absorb it. Yes, the robots are going to be much-much smarter than we expect them to be and they’re not only going to teach you but will design your learning material as well. And that’s not all as they will also produce virtual content such as video lectures to help you understand better. If you’re a visual learner like me, you couldn’t get more excited, could you?

One such example of such technology is Cram101, which has AI as its driving force and produces textbooks that are easier to understand and navigate. If you’ve had a hard time understanding a textbook (and I’m sure you have), smart content could be of immense help.

5. Adding Games to Your Education

Go back to your Kindergarten days and remember how your teacher used to teach you by making you play different games. Machine learning is going to do the same. Well, sort of. Many researchers and companies are exploring the possibility of constructing tactical games for students to speed up their understanding and make the process fun at the same time. There are plenty of apps available in the market which use a gamification approach i.e. Duolingo.

Gamification is crucial in education because our current methods of learning, namely reading and listening, are very limited in serving their purpose because of our human limitations. It’s been researched that learners recall only 10% of what they hear and only 20% of what they actively listen to. This number rises to 30% if you add visual presentations but not above that. However, if students are given the job to teach themselves through a game, they recall around a whopping 90%!

If I were a student, I’d be licking my lips (well, not literally) for such games. And you know what? Many are. Almost 80% of the students responded that they’ll welcome such learning, and so would you.

Last Word

We’ve witnessed massive changes in the way we eat, shop, communicate, and many other day-to-day aspects of our lives. And now, we’re on the verge of witnessing a remarkable fundamental change that will redefine our paradigms of learning. It’s no longer the question of ifs and buts, now only one question remains and that is ‘when.’

Author’s Bio: Pete McCain is a technology startup enthusiast, associated with AppVelocity – one of the best app development companies in Toronto. He has collaborated with more than 50 entrepreneurs – over the last decade – to maximize growth and contribute to technical excellence.

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.

10 Education Trends that will Shape the 2019-2020 Academic Year

The following is a guest post by Linda Cartwright, an online college-level English and creative writing teacher. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us

The trends shaping the next academic year are nothing new – we’ve heard about some of them for years. Yet now they are becoming a reality, manifesting themselves in classrooms rather than in catchy headlines. What benefits and challenges will they bring into yours?

The Changing Role of a Teacher

A teacher is shifting from someone who knows things to someone who is a newbie, like the rest of the class. The difference is, she has extensive experience at being a newbie and that’s something she is here to share – to model handling the situation of uncertainty or failure, model problem-solving, life-long learning and inquisitive curiosity. Essentially, to equip students with skills they need to get to knowledge independently.

The teacher of the 21st century is in the classroom to nurture learners, not to feed data. That’s the crux of the student-centered approach – not one-on-one classes, or more time spent individually coaching every student. The role of the teacher in 2019 is guiding their class through activities and sharing in the wonder of discovery.

Of course, monitoring the personal progress of the students and individually helping those who experience difficulties is important. However, without shifting the perspective first, it’s not realistic, especially with schools that cannot afford smaller classes or more space for teacher’s plan time. Therefore, shifting the perspective is the key – scaling up (or rather down in this case) is the next step.

Artificial Intelligence Learning

If a teacher is there to inspire and facilitate, then AI is taking up the role of personalized tutoring, where skills must be trained. Digital learning environments and intelligent tutoring system offer amazing flexibility at no time costs, which makes an efficient support system to K12 teachers.

Language learning apps like Duolingo or writing tools like No Red Ink demonstrate how AI-powered systems provide individual revisions plan and interest-based learning. Other tools like that are available for various subjects. AI’s analyzing capacity enable real-time feedback and continual targeted practice. Content analysis is another apt ability of AI and a helpful tool in assessing the individual progress of the student. It allows teachers to understand students’ needs better and, being equipped with more information – to tailor better lesson plans.

AI is an ultimate teacher’s assistant that frees the teacher of the most time-consuming and monotonous tasks, such as tests and checking papers for plagiarism, leaving more place to utilize teacher’s human-specific skills like emotional intelligence and creativity.

AI application in education is still in its early stages, but its potential must not be overlooked. It is expected that the use of AI in the US classrooms will increase by 47.5% in the next three years.

Augmented Reality Training

Augmented reality is an illustrious example of an old saying – a picture is worth a thousand words. However, how is AR better than VR or just a 3D image on a screen?

AR expands our physical reality. AR tools are capable of projecting something abstract or hard to grasp from a flat diagram and making it real – be it a 3D model of the Solar system, a geometric shape complete with formulas and explanations, or a scheme of the human nervous system. However, in AR those projections are tied to physical objects – something solid that students can interact with, activating motor centers in their brains. This creates engaging, immersive experiences that are more likely to stay in their memory. Here are some videos that show how AR can be used in science and physical education.

On the other hand, AR can be used not only to bring flat images to life but also to substitute real-life activities tied to higher risk and potential danger – some lab experiments and demonstrations can only be conceivable in the school setting as AR simulations.

Cultivation of Empathy

Of course, managing emotions, self-regulation, resilience and determination may seem the most relevant aspects of emotional intelligence in education, but they are not the ones that take center stage in 2019. Empathy and compassion for others, communications skills, and relationships with classmates steal the limelight. Why?

Many teachers will agree that poor behavior in the classroom is a big problem. However, building a positive classroom culture is impossible without empathy. Empathy is necessary for building trust and friendship among students as well as for improving student-teacher relationships.

Moreover, by creating a safe and friendly environment in the classroom we facilitate group work and engagement when a child doesn’t have second thoughts about raising a hand to ask a question or make a suggestion. Also, schools that incorporate empathy into the learning process have higher achieving students.

There are various resources and lessons plans online that will help to incorporate empathy into your curriculum. However, ultimately, teaching empathy is leading your students by example. It’s up to you to notice and reject stereotypes, respect and value differences of your students, urge them to widen their circle of concern and, of course, manage your own difficult feelings.

Hybrid Homeschooling

Homeschoolers can attend self-directed learning centers for certain subjects that their parents don’t feel confident enough teaching. Instead of having gaps in their knowledge and getting paper help on a subject they are undertrained in, they can catch up and rectify the situation in a hybrid school.

This way students have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the school setting, socialize with peers, and choose what and how they will learn.

Overall this system allows more flexibility with scheduling for both students and teachers. One of my closest friends used to teach English and Literature in K12 but had to step down for a while to care for her first child. Now she continues her work as an English and Literature teacher in a hybrid school. This way she has smaller classes, more motivated and engaged students, and more time to spend with her daughter. She also does private tutoring in-home so her schedule is quite flexible, which suits her lifestyle at the moment perfectly.

This trend will probably influence the number of parents who choose to homeschool. According to EdChoice’s 2017 Schooling in America survey, while only 3% of parents homeschool their children, 7% more would homeschool if they could. The hybrid option makes it possible.

Genius Hour

Students are choosing what they want to learn during a Genius Hour, which gives them some room for agency in the otherwise structured and prescribed curriculum. The self-directed and self-paced mode of learning promotes autonomy, inquiry, and creativity. There are only two requirements: genius hour must be about student’s passion and it must have some purpose – the essential question driving the project.

Helping students to discover their passions and find the purpose is the task for you as a teacher, of course. While some students will thrive unencumbered with limitations, others will need some structure and coaching provided by you.

Take time to learn more about them, observe. Something that comes easily to them or something they spend much time on isn’t necessarily something they are intrinsically motivated in. A colleague of mine who teaches Math once told me about a brilliant student who was way ahead of the curriculum and solved all math problems with ease and in unconventional ways. However, when she approached him and suggested he’d join a math hobby group, the child winced: “More Math?”

It turned out he didn’t like Math at all! His parents encouraged and trained him at home because they had plans for his future education and career. The boy was much more interested in nature, and the highlight of the day for him was caring for his pet turtle.

Personalized Learning

Personalized learning is often confused with the individualized approach to teaching. It has always been necessary to take into account individual strengths and struggles of each student, so why is personalized learning a new trend at all? The answer is that personalized learning is much more holistic. While individualized approach made allowances for differences between students, it was still a standard-based education. That is, however flexible the learning models, the result had to be the same – a student competent in the approved content.

Meanwhile, in personalized learning, everything, including content, pacing, sequence, and technology must be adjusted to suit each student’s interests, curiosity, and learning purpose. The result of such education should be a student that is competent in the process of learning rather than in prescribed content. This makes perfect sense in our information-rich world, where everything is searchable but you must have a clear idea of what you are looking for and why you need it.

Personalized learning sounds great, but isn’t it beyond the reach of a single teacher who has a whole class of unique students on her hands? That’s where all the AI tools, Genius Hours and hybrid homeschooling come to the rescue, broadening the possibilities for us all.

Blended Learning

Blended learning is more than iPads in the classroom and animated apps to keep tech-savvy students stimulated and interested. It is a mode of learning that is the only answer if we want to keep all the benefits of face-to-face learning with the flexibility of personalized learning.

Blended learning allows for aligning many contradicting schedules, matching varying paces of different students and a variety of content types. It also implies individual preparation for in-class activity and student collaboration outside the classroom. With various online spaces, collaboration platforms, communities, and chat rooms it’s a second (or even first!) nature for today’s school-age children.

Still, it is crucial that the teacher provides instructions and feedback on navigating through these activities. The blended learning approach allows enhances personalized learning, but it benefits from structure, encouragement, and guidance that only a face-to-face communication with a teacher or mentor can provide.

Gamification of Education

Gamification has been a huge buzzword for years now, but the possibilities of this approach are often dismissed as shallow because they are largely misunderstood. Sprinkling games here and there to boost engagement or reward students for being patient is not what gamification is about.

Gamification requires a fundamental change in our approach to learning. It’s changing education at its core – designing it anew according to game design principles. We must remember that learning is inherently fun – human brains are wired to respond positively to discovery, pattern-recognition, risk, role play. Learning becomes boring when it stops being play, fun, and discovery-driven and becomes something that is done to students.

Humans play games not only when they are young but during their entire lives. The fundamental similarities of learning and games are exploration, pattern-recognition, discovery, and sense of progress. Gamified educations is nothing but learning that reclaimed all those things. It can happen without the use of digital tools entirely. Competitiveness, cooperation, risk-taking, trade-off choices, immediate feedback, the progress that is a reward in itself, and joy in the process of learning are the highlight of properly gamified learning. Students find satisfaction in leveling-up their knowledge instead of “earning” a grade. They learn because it is a fun thing to do – not to arrive at the point where they know this and that. Just like we play to have fun – not to finish the game as quickly as possible or collect an impressive score.

Coding in Humanities

Applied linguistics was dabbing into coding since the first computers were invented. After all, code is just another language and you can even see a loose correlation between the syntax structure of a sentence and a line of code. In fact, what makes a linguistics specialist different from any other person is the fact that a linguist sees a natural language as a code and not simply something we all use and that happens naturally.

More companies began to see the need in well-rounded specialists – someone who not only codes but understands how humans interact with technology, what problems it should solve and what real-world concerns should be considered. Moreover, the key competencies that make one good at coding are critical thinking and creative problem-solving – something humanity graduates are famous for. The stereotype that you need a Computer Science degree and a life-long love for Math to code is wearing off.

What does that mean for a teacher? The ability to code is a new literacy, therefore you will do better if you acquire some basic coding skills. Even an amateurish code will make it possible to handle your research data much faster. You will be able to tailor apps for your classes or elicit data from student questionnaires and see correlations that would otherwise go unnoticed, thus gaining valuable insights into ways to improve your work as a teacher. Moreover, you will be able to integrate coding into your curriculum and show your students how coding can be used even if they chose literature as their primary field of interest.

Here you can find a selection of free coding games, which is very apt given the blended learning and gamification trends going on. Enjoy them yourself or share with your class – don’t be afraid of being newbies together!

Author’s Bio: Linda Cartwright is a believer in life-long learning and an ambassador of technology in K12 and Higher Ed. She teaches college-level English and creative writing online and is working on her first book. Find her on Twitter

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.

How E-Learning Has Evolved Over the Past Few Years

The following is a guest post written by Mary Walton , a professional editor and content strategist. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us.

Can you believe that 2009 was a decade ago? Time seems to pass by with extreme speed and the world keeps changing with it. Many changes happened in the world that influenced e-learning directly. Many colleges and universities started to include e-learning in their programs and students got more interested in it. E-learning started to be used more in the early 2000s, but some evidence suggests that the early forms of the practice have been around as far back as the 19th century. The term “e-learning” was first used in 1999, and other words such as “online learning” and “virtual learning” have been known to be used. As Heraclitus said, “The only thing that is constant is change.” This applies in the sphere of e-learning as well, so if you’re interested in learning more about the development and evolution of e-learning, keep reading!

Early starts

The concept of learning at a distance has been around since before the time of the internet. Distance courses were offered to educate people that were in a different location. Issac Pitman, developer of the most widely used system of shorthand, taught his students via correspondence back in the 1840’s. In 1924, the first testing machine was invented which allowed those who were learning, to test themselves. 30 years later, a Harvard Professor by the name of BF Skinner invented a machine that permitted schools to offer programmed instructions to the students.

In the ’60s, the first computer-based training program was made and it was called PLATO or Programmed Logic for Automated Teaching Operations. Originally, it was made for students that were attending the University of Illinois but ended up being used in many schools in the area. When it comes to the first online learning systems, they happened in the ’70s when interaction began to be more used.

1999-2004

Online learning started to get widespread mostly due to the convenient form it had, offering people courses that they could attend without having to change the location. It gave people more options. However, the content was being transferred through text or poorly scanned documents, the convenience of this type of learning overshadowed the quality of the courses. The majority of the courses were based on one-way communication with some exceptions where online discussion forums were available. However, back then the internet wasn’t as nearly as strong as now and the connection was very problematic.

Another thing that happened in the 2000s when it comes to e-learning was the fact that the businesses started to incorporate e-learning in their employee training programs. At that time, the employees were offered new and exciting opportunities to make improvements in their fields’ knowledge and to expand their skill sets.

2005-2010

At this point, it was clear that e-learning was an emerging industry even besides the resistance that it came across from public education, workplaces, and academia. The benefits of the new computer-based training were well-known by this point especially the immediate feedback and the virtual support. However, at that time we still had many problems related to this since we had slower platforms and browser compatibilities. The limited technology tools that were used back then were at times frustrating for the people that adopted the e-learning practices. This, of course, was the reason to inspire faster and more qualitative development of the industry while pointing out how to detox the mild issues.

2011-2015

E-learning became very popular and it was a well-known mode of delivering education and training within many sectors. The potential of the whole concept was finally fully grasped and with the new, modern technologies available that at the same time became very affordable, e-learning was widely present. The positive benefits of this type of learning were better communication, exploring, expressing, networking, creating which was all in the hands of the consumers. At this point, an overwhelming amount of e-learning options became available making the market much more aggressive which at times made those who offered the courses make promises that they can’t keep.

E-learning today

Today, there are many newer trends that make e-learning even more functional and attractive to people. Some of those are:

  • Microlearning: is a type of learning represented by short bursts of bite-sized content. No sitting behind the screen for hours, but a short on-demand knowledge that was made possible by the high consumption of mobiles.
  • Social learning: a way of training a geographically diverse workforce that is driven by social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and more.
  • Virtual and Augmented Realities: this option turns any classroom into any possible environment which is perfect for as real as possible training of the students. VR/AR are empowering the content of e-learning and make many opportunities possible for easier learning.

There are many more trends that are currently used, and the reality is that e-learning will further develop along with the development of the technology.

10 ‘Links’ That Make the Chain of e-Learning [INFOGRAPHIC]

The following is a guest post by Shristi Patni, content writer and Chief Content Officer at Raletta and PR Bulls. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us

Companies across the globe are now utilizing e-learning to meet their business goals. However, there’s more to it when it comes down to developing e-learning courses than just meticulous planning and careful execution.

What are the areas that need to be identified when developing an e-learning course? We bring you a handy checklist.


This infographic was made by Navrajvir Singh, content contributor at Crazy Over Marketing and Minting Cash.


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Author’s Bio: Shristi is the Chief Content Officer at Raletta (Digital Marketing Agency), and PR Bulls (Content Marketing Agency). She enjoys writing about food, fitness, finance and everything in between.

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.


9 eLearning Stats Every Student Should Know in 2019

The following is a guest post written by Hugh Beaulac, blogger, social media manager, and content strategist. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us.

The rise of modern technologies affects our lives, so it’s no wonder it has an impact on traditional teaching methods. Living in the digital era, eLearning isn’t a new concept even though many students are afraid of giving it a try: lack of control, social isolation, and low motivation are just a few reasons why students don’t want to study online.

However, learning online can be a great idea to obtain knowledge without spending time on attending lectures. If you’re doubting whether eLearning can suit your needs and wants, you’re welcome to look through the list of statistics that prove it is the future of education.

Here are 9 eLearning stats every student should know in 2019.

#1. Around one half of all classes are done online.

Elearning gives many opportunities for both teachers and students. Moreover, it’s important to keep up with the trends, so eLearning is getting more and more popular. One in two lessons is done online which means students can expect even more online lectures in the nearest future.

#2. eLearning increases knowledge retention by 25% to 60%.

Humans are visually-oriented creatures, so it’s no wonder we perceive visual information better. When you study online, you work with various visual content  – presentations, videos, infographics. As a result, knowledge retention is increasing.

#3. eLearning is generally shorter than classroom training on the same subject by up to 25-60%.

When you study online, you save a considerable amount of time as the educational process is focused on providing the right information to the right person at the right time which means obtaining knowledge faster.

#4. 60% of people say that online courses fit their personal schedule/lifestyle better.

The best thing about online learning is an opportunity to do it in your spare time. Whether you learn new material, do your homework, or communicate with a mentor, it’s you who decides when to do it, so eLearning can suit any lifestyle.

#5. 81% of college students agree that digital learning technology helps to improve their grades.

With a variety of online educational organizations, it’s easy to pick a course to get a deeper understanding of any subject. Moreover, it’s a proven way to get additional knowledge, and therefore improve grades.

#6. 52% of people use m-learning in bed after waking up.

Nowadays the educational process is about comfort and time optimization. It’s enough to have access to the internet to do your course wherever you are.

#7. 90% of students believe online learning is better than traditional classroom experience.

For the majority of students, eLearning gives many opportunities to make the educational process more interactive and creative. As a result, they are more engaged.

#8. VR/AR educational software is predicted to get $300 million in revenue by 2020.

No matter what your major subject is, it’s important to ensure you get an engaging learning experience in order to be interested in the educational process. With the rise of VR/AR, students have an opportunity to be engaged in the process.

#9. The global mobile learning market is estimated to be $37.6 billion by 2022.

Nowadays more and more people own a smartphone, and it’s not just a way to connect with people – it’s also a way to obtain knowledge on the go. There are many apps and mobile-friendly educational websites that allow people to improve skills wherever they are.

Final Thoughts

There are many reasons why eLearning is just the future of education. The above-mentioned statistics facts prove that people love learning online and eLearning gives many benefits to modern learners. Thus, it’s important to get rid of your worries and give online education a try.

Author’s Bio:Hugh Beaulac is a blogger, social media manager, and content strategist who helps people fall in love with STEM disciplines. He writes for different websites to share his knowledge, so follow him on Twitter to stay tuned for more.

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.

5 Lesser Known Benefits of Online Education

The following is a guest post written by Shristi Patni, content writer and Chief Content Officer at Raletta and PR Bulls. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us

Sure, online education has its disadvantages but there are various advantages of online learning that prove why it might be the greatest revolution in today’s education.

The traditional education system has its limitations. To begin with, “you need to pay hundreds, probably thousands of dollars to get into a prestigious institute” says Navrajvir Singh, Co-founder of Merrchant.

“Then comes the course shortages, busy classrooms, and budget cuts which means you won’t always get to study what you want” he adds.

Therefore, it comes as no surprise that 46 percent of college students and professionals throughout the world are opting for at least one online program or taking at least one course through an online platform.

According to Point University, roughly half of college courses will be eLearning-based by 2019.

It’s about time we broke the stereotypes associated with online learning such as ‘it’s for individuals who are not smart enough’, or ‘they’re not “real” degrees’.

We bring you five lesser-known advantages of online learning

  1. Study What You Want

With the advancement of technology, you no longer have to leave your home and travel to an unknown city to take up your dream course. With e-learning, you can now take up any course from short certificate courses to the traditional four-year programs.

 

  1. Flexible

Hate waking up early for a class? You’re in luck. From choosing your own timings to choosing your teachers, and choosing your examination dates to examination centers, online courses are incredibly flexible.

You can not only access these courses from the comfort of your home but from anywhere in the world.

 

  1. They Add to Your Resume

An online degree or course from say, Stanford University will look great, maybe even better than most full-time community college degrees. In fact, it shows your potential employers that you are committed to learning and eager to gain more skills or knowledge.

 

  1. Networking Opportunities

Yes, your university might admit students from different cultures and nations to increase diversity but can it really compete with online networks? Generally, new courses start every month which means students get enrolled each month. On the other hand, traditional colleges admit students only once or twice a year.

 

  1. Value For Money

The fact that online courses are cheaper than traditional campus courses should convince you to consider them. On average, you are likely to spend a minimum of ₹500,000 (or $7,000) on an MBA program from a prestigious university in India.

However, if you opted for a distance learning program (from the very same university) you’d only have to shell out ₹75,000 (or $1,000)!

Final Thoughts

Online degree programs and courses are cheaper and more convenient when compared to traditional education. These two advantages are enough for you to consider online programs when you want to earn a certificate or a degree.

The best part, though, is that you get to learn in a relaxed manner. All you need is the zeal to learn and an internet connection, and you’re good to go.

 

Author’s Bio: Shristi is the Chief Content Officer at Raletta (Digital Marketing Agency), and PR Bulls (Content Marketing Agency). She enjoys writing about food, fitness, finance and everything in between.

 

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.

 

 

Should We Incorporate Social Media Into Online Education?

The following is a guest post written by Emily Johnson, freelance blogger and content writer. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us.

Let’s be honest: online teaching and learning is not easy. Both instructors as well as students need to deal with a number of problems that arise from the limitations of virtual education. Thus, online instruction requires novel, creative methods, which would help students acquire new knowledge and make them feel less isolated.

Does social media have the power to improve virtual education? Can it solve most of the problems both online educators as well as online students strive to overcome each and every day? Would incorporating it into virtual teaching and learning make a difference? Keep on reading to find out.

The Challenges of Online Education and How Social Media Can Help To Overcome Them

Whether you’re a teacher who considers conducting online courses or a student who got enchanted by an idea of getting a degree online and wants to try, chances are that you think there’s nothing complicated about it:

  • As an online tutor, all you’ll have to do is to prepare materials, upload them on a site, and then, check the progress of your students and provide them with feedback.
  • As an online student, all you’ll have to do is download materials from a website, study them at home, and then, do the homework and upload it on a site.

That’s it, right? Unfortunately, in practice, it’s more complicated than that. Each step of the way only seems to be easy. In reality, problems arise. Problems, which can be hard to deal with and solve.

#1 Computer literacy.

Attending and creating an online course requires a person to develop new computer skills, and while professors may already have the knowledge on how to navigate the necessary systems and programs, many students don’t. Research shows that computer literacy of university graduates is low. Thus, we can assume that computer literacy of students who just begin their studies or are in the middle of them isn’t any better.

Now, to be able to fully participate in an online course, students need to learn to use LMS (i.e. Learning Management System), be able to operate such programs as MS Word or PowerPoint, and fix computer problems if they occur. Without any technological knowledge and skills, it can be a challenge too hard to deal with.

Also, although “Help Pages” and detailed FAQ sections may be of some help, finding the necessary information and following instruction can be time-consuming, problematic, and frustrating. Thus, here’s another idea:

To allow students to contact and chat with a computer expert via a social media platform. It’s fast and easy. Moreover, this way, students can quickly improve their computer skills and feel more supported in their studies.

#2 Communication problems and the lack of human contact.

Conducting as well as participating in an online course often results in communication problems and limits for both professors as well as students. Thus, exchanging thoughts, sharing ideas, asking questions, clarifying various issues, explaining the course material, or simply talking, may take some time and be difficult (especially if it can only happen in the LMS or via email). What’s more, distance learning means learning away from a campus and student dormitories, which can affect a person’s sense of belonging to a community of students and so, make them feel isolated.

Can we improve communication between online tutors and students, and help students make friendships, share their thoughts, and interact with their peers? Yes, we can. Social media is the answer.

By promoting the use of social media and creating special groups for students on such platforms as Facebook, we can help teachers contact their students (and vice versa) quickly from any device, and we provide students with a perfect place to talk to their peers, discuss problems, share various ideas or reviews, and form a community. In fact, in a recent study, 75% of students say they feel comfortable using social networking to discuss course work with other students and 58% use it to communicate with their classmates.

Now, since students find social media platforms useful for educational purposes as well as forming friendships, incorporating social media into online education can both improve communication between students and teachers, and make students feel less lonely.

#3 Boredom, self-motivation and time-management.

Although online courses work for a number of students, many fail an online class, especially at community colleges. Why? Well, in a study conducted in 2011, students provided a number of reasons why you may fail an online course, and so, drop out of college. Here are the causes:

  • Motivation (35%).
  • Study habits (17%).
  • Academic preparedness (12%).
  • External factors (11%).
  • Attitudes (11%).
  • Instruction (10%).
  • Relevancy issues (4%).

What also has a negative impact on online students is the fact that e-learning may sometimes feel like e-reading. Thus, online courses lack variety and can be simply boring. After all, not everyone find reading textbooks and other materials as the best way to learn. Some students acquire new knowledge by listening to lectures. Others prefer doing things in practice. There are also those who learn best by watching videos. So, variety in virtual education is a must to keep students engaged.

Now, since online students are not self-motivated to learn, find it hard to create and stick to their own learning schedules, and often get bored, is there anything we can do to help them? As a matter of fact, yes, there is. Social media gives us a possibility to solve a number of problems that online students face.

Here are several creative ideas on how educators can use social media platforms to support their students:

  • Create and post inspirational and motivational quotes on Facebook, and thus, help your students achieve their goals.
  • Send reminders about assignments and upcoming deadlines via online platforms.
  • Make competitions and contests (thus, you can encourage creative writing, help students improve their skills in a number of areas, and entertain them).
  • Instead of uploading another longish lecture on a website for your students to read, make a video lesson on YouTube.
  • Ask intriguing questions in posts and so, start an online discussion (let your students engage in a conversation with you as well as their peers).
  • Encourage your students to make posts or tweets on a given topic for extra credit.

As you can see, social media gives a number of possibilities to help students succeed in an online class.

Final Thoughts

There are many reasons why we should incorporate social media into online education. First of all, students are familiar with it, so they will have no problems with accessing materials on social media platforms or contacting their teachers. Also, social media platforms can help students to form and maintain interactions with others. Moreover, it allows online students to ask more questions and get answers fast.

For online teachers, social media gives a lot of new opportunities as well. Teachers can easily contact their students, have more possibilities to help them acquire new knowledge as well as engage them. Also, it’s much faster, easier, and convenient to give students feedback via a social media platform than an online system.

Thus, by incorporating social media into virtual education we’ve nothing to lose, and a lot to gain.

Author’s Bio: Emily Johnson is a college graduate who spends her free time writing thought-provoking blog posts about education, college life, blogging, and writing. Her articles that give career advice help and inspire people all over the Web. To find out more about Emily, check out her Twitter.

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.

Distance Education- a Necessity, not an Accessory

39243336_sWCET, the WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies (founded by the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education- WICHE), recently published a report that studied Distance Education Enrollment from the Fall 2014 semester.  The purpose behind their study was to analyze the overall trend in enrollment in Distance Learning programs and to summarize their findings in a concise and readable manner.

They found the following:

  • Not only has enrollment in Distance Education programs increased, but the overall matriculation into higher education programs has declined. This makes the increase in online learners that much more significant
  • More than 1-in-4 students (28%) are taking at least one course online or through a distance education program
  • The majority of distance education enrollments (85%) were in public institutions, with 48% of students who are exclusively distance learners enrolling in these institutions.

See the full report here.

 

Sources:

WCET Distance Education Enrollment Report 2016, by Russ Poulin & Terri Taylor Straut

Distance Education is Here to Stay, by Colin Wood