Cybersecurity for the Stay-at-Home Semester (Infographic)

With the shift of learning to online platforms, cybersecurity remains a crucial objective to keep in mind. By following the below tips, you can ensure that you and your students’ learning takes place in a secure, confidential, and positive environment! The #stayathome semester is here, and we’re excited to help you make the most of it!

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.

Introduction to Online Learning Terminology

Now is an exciting time for both instructors and students to learn more about online education and distance learning! As with any field, online learning comes with its own set of terms. This handy guide covers some frequently used online learning terminology, giving you a brief summary of some of the most common tools and trends that you may encounter as an instructor or student!

Asynchronous Learning: Asynchronous learning refers to online education that does not take place at a specific time. In an asynchronous online course, the learning is self-paced, and students can complete it at times that are convenient for them.

Discussion Boards: A popular online learning tool in which an instructor poses a question that students must respond to. Discussion boards are a great opportunity to continue peer-to-peer interaction in a virtual setting. Incorporating multimedia into discussion boards, for example, using VoiceThread for audio submissions or Flipgrid for video responses, is a great and easy way to keep students engaged in online discussions.

Gamification: The principle of incorporating game theory into online learning. Gamification aims to make learning fun and can be accomplished through the usage of educational technology tools. Some fun tools to use to gamify your learning activities include Quizlet, easily created flashcards that can be played in game mode, and Socrative, a tool that can incorporate real-time polling and quizzes into your classes.

Instructional Design: The process of systematically designing and implementing instructional material, relying on a blend of cognitive psychology and educational principles. Instructional design can be an essential component of online education, and instructional designers are trained professionals who are equipped to assist instructors in designing optimal online learning experiences for their students.

Synchronous Learning: Synchronous learning refers to online education that takes place at specific times, for example, a class that meets over Zoom at a dedicated time each week

LMS: An acronym for “Learning Management System.” An LMS refers to the software through which an online class can be delivered. Several commonly used LMSs are Canvas, Blackboard, Moodle, and Google Classroom.

MOOC: An acronym for “massive open online course.” MOOCs are online courses that can have an unlimited amount of participation and open access across the internet. MOOCs highlight one of the most exciting qualities of online education – the ability to equalize access to education worldwide!

Zoom: Zoom is a popular video-conferencing technology that has been utilized to transfer many classes to distance education. Zoom can be an important way to maintain a classroom environment virtually and allow for continued instructor and peer interaction.

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.

5 Mistakes to Look Out For As An Online Student

The following is a guest post by Ellie Coverdale, a tutor and content creator. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us

Technology is at the stage today where all sorts of different areas of life are being handled over the internet. From grocery shopping to visiting the doctor, the power of the internet is immense. One such area is education. Online education courses have actually been around for many years now, but in recent years there’s been a marked increase in the quality and quantity of what’s being achieved. Some online educational courses are now easily rivaling and even bettering classroom learning and other traditional methods of education. As a method that is still somewhat unorthodox, and certainly nowhere near as explored as the traditional routes, there are things that you need to be careful about with online studies. So, without further ado, let’s look at some of the mistakes you should be avoiding as an online student.

1. Failing to Properly Manage your Time

There’s something so convenient and easy about the idea of online education and, subsequently, it can feel like a method you can adopt without upsetting the rhythms of your life elsewhere. However, this is most certainly the wrong attitude to have. Online education is as important, in terms of the hours you put in, as in the classroom education. And whilst you might be cutting out the commute, there’ s no reason why you shouldn’t be scheduling in a detailed way when you’re at your computer studying and when you don’t have to be. The convenient nature to it makes it so easy to procrastinate. Suddenly you find yourself at 3am watching the lecture you were supposed to watch that afternoon, all because you didn’t manage your time formally and efficiently.

2. Not Firming Up Technical Capacities

Before leaping into your new online course or degree, there are a few things you need to look out for from a technical standpoint. One of the most important of these is making sure you have all of the technical specifications that you need for your device to be able to cope with the programs and processes that you will be running as part of your degree. Having a slow running computer, or, even worse, slow internet could really cripple your ability to complete live tasks. Often online education courses will make you stream live lectures or need to have many different pages and sites open at one time. These sorts of technical pressures can turn online education into a nightmare if you can’t meet them. So get prepared.

3. Always Being Isolated

It’s easy to just be on your own all the time when in online education. It’s one of those mixed blessings. On the one hand, it’s nice to be alone and, for some, it can help you focus better on the material at hand. On the other hand, communal learning has its real benefits and having someone who you can ask questions to or discuss topics with really enhances education. You shouldn’t aim for total isolation in your online course, try and find ways to work around others sometimes. Or, failing that, you should try and Skype or video chat with another student as you do the course together.

4. Allowing Temptation To Creep In

Online learning requires discipline, simple as that. A computer can be used for all sorts of things, a great percentage of which are entertainment oriented. When your computer is also your school, there’s definitely a sense in which it is extremely easy to get distracted on Facebook or YouTube, especially since there’s no-one to stop you. Consider using a site blocker if you have a problem.

5. Not Participating

It’s easy to be in online education and to just sit back and be a passive observer of events. Just because you’re not actually being distracted or procrastinating, doesn’t mean that you don’t need to do more than simply be present. Actively engage, ask questions and try your hardest.

Conclusion

Online education presents a wonderful opportunity to people from all sorts of different parts of the world and from all walks of life to come together, through the power of the internet, and get a really good education from their own homes. Just look out for these pitfalls and you should be fine!

Author’s Bio: Ellie Coverdale works as a tutor and blogger. She loves sharing her insights and tips on authentic, meaningful psychological routes towards learning with her readers. She also contributes to https://studydemic.com/

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.

5 Things to Consider Before Taking an Online Course

The following is a guest post by Emma Megan, a content creator specializing in education. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us

Introduction:

Technology has changed every aspect of our lives, and education is no exception. We’ve gone from learning through direct contact to acquiring knowledge from behind a laptop screen.

Online courses have revolutionized the convenience and affordability of education. Anyone who has limited finances and time can sign up for any online course that they’re interested in, but they should be sure to carefully consider the following things:

1. You will probably NEVER meet your professor

Online courses are designed to keep things simple and comfortable both for the students enrolled and the professors teaching the classes. Professors who teach online courses, record their lectures beforehand, and those lectures can be used to illustrate the same sequence for several years to come.

Just as a student takes online classes because of the lack of time and money, the professors have pretty much the same reasons to teach an online course. They don’t want additional pressure and stress from their side jobs; hence, you will hardly ever meet your professor.

If you are always seeking guidance and assurance, then you might not find it while taking online classes. Online courses are for people who are self-sufficient and independent, as well as for those who can comprehend instructions easily.

2. All online classes are not equal

Recently, online courses have experienced a growth spurt in their numbers. Now you can get a high school diploma online as well as a master’s degree without stepping a foot out of your house. All these courses offer something diverse, and they function differently from one another.

For instance, some online courses will require you to read and review chapters daily, while others will ask you to submit a written report every other day at 9 PM sharp. Not only the nature of work and assignments, but the duration and tuition fees differ as well. 

It is essential to weigh down all your options before deciding, to avoid complications in the future. You should also consider the possibility of transferring your online course from one university to another. Think of an alternative before even signing up for an online course as it can save you from plenty of trouble and stress in the future. 

3. You can interact with your fellow students

You might be under the impression that taking online courses mean that you won’t have to deal with a peer group, but online courses actually offer several ways to collaborate with fellow students. Most online courses offered by conventional colleges and universities have online chat rooms. These chatrooms and online communities provide several opportunities for people enrolled in the same online course to interact and help each other out. Discussion boards are another key means of interaction.

Even without an online community and chatroom, one can always try to contact their classmates directly. Almost all online courses show profiles of students enrolled in their curriculum to other students for this purpose. 

4. You need to be technologically advanced

Online courses are essential for our fast-paced world, which means they are in sync with technology. One should never sign up for an online course if they are not well-versed in technology or do not have adequate equipment.

A working laptop and a fast wi-fi network are essentials to have before signing up for any online course. The people managing your class won’t care if you are laptop broke down or your wi-fi didn’t work. They will want you to submit all your assignments and tasks at the assigned time, or else your grade will be affected. 

Believe it or not, accredited online courses have a way to weed out dishonest and students that are slacking. If you think that cheating in exams or delaying your assignments is a possibility, then you are in for a surprise. 

These courses have systems in place that enable them to maintain the integrity and credibility of their programs.

5. An online course is not for procrastinator

Online courses are not everyone’s cup of tea and are not the ideal model of education for procrastinators. One must have impeccable time management skills and restraint to complete these courses.

You might want to sign up for an online class because you want to be your boss, but that perk isn’t good enough if you can’t keep up with the obligations that come with it. There won’t be any professor and friend to remind you to finish your assignments or to prepare for a test before the deadline. You will be on your own and carelessness, and irresponsible behavior can cost you a lot.

Bottom Line:

Online courses have their pros and cons, and their efficiency and success vary from person to person. Thorough research and knowledge of the intended online course can help you reach a decision that will work best for you!

Author’s Bio: Emma Megan is a content creator who enjoys writing about education and technology.

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.

5 Things Online Institutions Need to Understand About their Students [INFOGRAPHIC]

The following is a guest post by Shristi Patni, content writer and Chief Content Officer at Raletta and PR Bulls, and Navrajvir Singh, content creator at Cute Insides and Fun Travellers. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us

This infographic visually explores what community colleges and online institutions need to understand about their students.
Learners/individuals seeking a blended or online education have a specific set of needs and expectations that can be best handled by a learning management system. 

This infographic was made by Navrajvir Singh, content creator at Cute Insides and Fun Travellers.

Author’s Bio: Shristi is the Chief Content Officer at Raletta (Digital Marketing Agency), and PR Bulls (Content Marketing Agency). She enjoys writing about food, fitness, finance and everything in between.

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.

5 Lesser Known Benefits of Online Education

The following is a guest post written by Shristi Patni, content writer and Chief Content Officer at Raletta and PR Bulls. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us

Sure, online education has its disadvantages but there are various advantages of online learning that prove why it might be the greatest revolution in today’s education.

The traditional education system has its limitations. To begin with, “you need to pay hundreds, probably thousands of dollars to get into a prestigious institute” says Navrajvir Singh, Co-founder of Merrchant.

“Then comes the course shortages, busy classrooms, and budget cuts which means you won’t always get to study what you want” he adds.

Therefore, it comes as no surprise that 46 percent of college students and professionals throughout the world are opting for at least one online program or taking at least one course through an online platform.

According to Point University, roughly half of college courses will be eLearning-based by 2019.

It’s about time we broke the stereotypes associated with online learning such as ‘it’s for individuals who are not smart enough’, or ‘they’re not “real” degrees’.

We bring you five lesser-known advantages of online learning

  1. Study What You Want

With the advancement of technology, you no longer have to leave your home and travel to an unknown city to take up your dream course. With e-learning, you can now take up any course from short certificate courses to the traditional four-year programs.

 

  1. Flexible

Hate waking up early for a class? You’re in luck. From choosing your own timings to choosing your teachers, and choosing your examination dates to examination centers, online courses are incredibly flexible.

You can not only access these courses from the comfort of your home but from anywhere in the world.

 

  1. They Add to Your Resume

An online degree or course from say, Stanford University will look great, maybe even better than most full-time community college degrees. In fact, it shows your potential employers that you are committed to learning and eager to gain more skills or knowledge.

 

  1. Networking Opportunities

Yes, your university might admit students from different cultures and nations to increase diversity but can it really compete with online networks? Generally, new courses start every month which means students get enrolled each month. On the other hand, traditional colleges admit students only once or twice a year.

 

  1. Value For Money

The fact that online courses are cheaper than traditional campus courses should convince you to consider them. On average, you are likely to spend a minimum of ₹500,000 (or $7,000) on an MBA program from a prestigious university in India.

However, if you opted for a distance learning program (from the very same university) you’d only have to shell out ₹75,000 (or $1,000)!

Final Thoughts

Online degree programs and courses are cheaper and more convenient when compared to traditional education. These two advantages are enough for you to consider online programs when you want to earn a certificate or a degree.

The best part, though, is that you get to learn in a relaxed manner. All you need is the zeal to learn and an internet connection, and you’re good to go.

 

Author’s Bio: Shristi is the Chief Content Officer at Raletta (Digital Marketing Agency), and PR Bulls (Content Marketing Agency). She enjoys writing about food, fitness, finance and everything in between.

 

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.

 

 

How to List Online Courses on Your Resume

The following is a guest post written by Jane Hurst, writer and freelance HR. If you would like to submit a guest post, please contact us.

These days, it is not uncommon for people to get their educations online. There are numerous online courses available, both from private sources and from accredited colleges and universities. If you have taken online courses, how do you list these on your resume? While they are something that can help you get the job (another candidate may not have taken these extra courses), they are not the only thing employers are looking for, nor should they be the highlight of your resume. Today we are going to talk about how to properly list online courses on your resume so they get the right kind of attention.

  1. Don’t Mention Intro Classes – You don’t usually learn much in an introductory class, so don’t mention these on your resume. If this is all you have, leave out the online classes all together, because this type of class shows that you are learning about the subject, and not actually an expert on it. It will show you as being less experienced and unqualified, even if you have taken other courses as well. Also, don’t waste your time and energy on online courses that are not related to the type of work that you want to do.
  2. List Online Classes Properly – No matter what type of online classes you have taken, and how much they relate to the job you want, it is not a good idea to list them first. Prospective employers want to see your work history and level of experience before they see your education. In many cases, the person with the most experience is going to be hired, even if other candidates have higher levels of education. Put online classes in their own section, such as “professional training” or something similar. This will get it noticed after they have seen your experience.
  3. List the Right Courses – While it is a good idea to list hobbies on your resume, this doesn’t mean that you should list every online course that you take. For instance, if you are into knitting and you have taken an online crafting course, it isn’t going to do much good on your resume if you are applying for an IT job. Only list the online courses you have taken that are directly related to the type of jobs you are applying for. For instance, if you have taken a marketing MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), or aced Coding Bootcamp, these are things to list.
  4. Show Practical Experience – After taking an online course, it is a good idea to work on a project that involves what you have learned. It may be that a local organization needs someone to volunteer for this type of work. While you may not be getting paid, you will be gaining a lot of experience, and when you can show that you have been able to put what you have learned to good use, it is going to impress a potential employer. Just be sure to keep the resume length to a minimum, and don’t turn this section into a book.
  5. Be Prepared to Answer Questions – If you have taken online courses, potential employers may want to test you on the skills you have learned. They may ask a lot of questions about the actual courses, or they may want to ask questions based on what you have told them you learned from the classes, especially if you are applying for a position that requires you to have a certain amount of technical expertise. While practicing for the interview, in addition to listing common interview questions, think of what the employer may ask in relation to the online courses you have taken.

 

Author’s Bio:

Jane Hurst is an editor from San Francisco. She works as a freelance HR and has written for various major publications. Find Jane on Twitter!

 

Reference herein to any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Touro College.